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The 5 Best Substitutes for Bramley Apple

Bramley apples are a type of cooking apple that originated in England.

They are large, tart, and have firm flesh that holds up well when cooked.

Bramleys are most commonly used in pies and other desserts but can also be used in savory dishes.

When substituting another type of apple in a recipe, it is important to choose one with a similar texture and flavor profile.

In this article, we will discuss the five best substitutes for Bramley apples.

What is Bramley Apple?

Their origins can be traced back to a chance seedling that first grew in the garden of Mary Ann Brailsford in the English village of Bramley, Derbyshire, around 1809.

The tree quickly became popular with local fruit growers, and by the mid-19th century, the Bramley apple was being sold commercially.

Today, it is still one of the most popular varieties in the UK.

The Bramley apple is large and round, with bright green skin that is covered in small red dots.

The flesh is white or pale green, and it has a tart, acidic flavor.

When cooked, the flesh breaks down to create a light, fluffy texture.

Bramley apples are typically used in pies and crumbles, as their sharp flavor helps to balance out the sweetness of other fruits.

They can also be used in savory dishes, such as pork and apple sauce.

The 5 Best Substitutes for Bramley Apple

If you’re looking for a Bramley apple substitute because you can’t find this particular type of apple where you live, or if you simply want to try something new, there are a few other options available.

Here are the five best substitutes for Bramley apples:

1 – Granny Smith Apple

The Granny Smith apple is a popular variety of apples that is known for its tart flavor and crisp texture.

It is named after Maria Ann Smith, who is credited with developing variety in Australia in the 19th century.

Today, Granny Smith apples are grown all over the world, and they are a common ingredient in pies, pastries, and other baked goods.

For many cooks, the Granny Smith apple is the perfect substitute for the Bramley apple, which is less widely available.

The Granny Smith apple has a slightly sour taste that pairs well with sweet fillings, and its firm flesh holds up well to baking.

As a result, it is one of the most versatile varieties of apples.

Whether you are looking for a tart addition to a pie or a crisp topping for an afternoon snack, the Granny Smith apple is sure to satisfy you.

2 – Honeycrisp Apple

The Honeycrisp apple is a variety of apple that is available from late September through early November.

Honeycrisp is a large apple with red and yellow skin.

The flesh of the apple is white and crisp, with a sweet flavor.

Honeycrisp can be used in any recipe that calls for apples, but they are particularly well suited for pies and other baking recipes.

When substituting Honeycrisp for Bramley apples, use 1 1/2 cups of Honeycrisp for every cup of Bramley apples called for in the recipe.

This substitution will result in a sweeter pie or another baking dish.

3 – Golden Delicious Apple

Golden delicious apples are sweet and slightly tart, with a creamy white flesh that is firm and crisp.

They are good all-purpose apples and can be used for both cooking and eating fresh.

When cooked, they hold their shape well and take on a lovely golden color.

Golden delicious apples are also a good substitute for Bramley apples in recipes.

Bramley apples are tart and acidic, with a coarse flesh that breaks down quickly when cooked.

Golden delicious apples have a similar acidity level, but their firmer flesh means they will hold up better in recipes.

So if you’re looking for an apple that can do it all, reach for a Golden delicious.

4 – Rome Beauty Apple

Rome Beauty apples are a variety of apple that is known for their tart flavor and crisp texture.

The skin of a Rome Beauty apple is thin and smooth, with a deep red color.

The flesh of the apple is white or creamy in color, and it has a firm texture.

Rome Beauty apples are often used in pies and other baked goods because of their tart flavor.

They can also be eaten fresh and are often used in salads.

When substituting Rome Beauty apples for Bramley apples, it is important to keep in mind that Bramley apples are more tart than Rome Beauty apples.

As a result, you may want to add more sugar or sweetener to your recipe to offset the tartness of the Rome Beauty apples.

5 – Jonathan Apple

Jonathan apples are a type of culinary apple that is prized for its sweet taste and crisp texture.

Unlike other apple varieties, Jonathan apples do not become mealy when cooked, making them ideal for pies and other baked goods.

Additionally, Jonathan apples have distinctive pinkish-red skin that makes them visually appealing.

When substituting Jonathan apples for Bramley apples, it is important to keep in mind that the Jonathan variety is slightly sweeter.

As a result, you may need to adjust the amount of sugar used in your recipe accordingly.

Overall, Jonathan apples are a versatile and delicious type of apple that can be used in a variety of recipes.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the Bramley apple is a type of apple that is prized for its tart flavor and firm flesh.

While it is not as widely available as other types of apples, there are a number of substitutes that can be used in its place.

The Granny Smith apple, Honeycrisp apple, Golden Delicious apple, Rome Beauty apple, and Jonathan apple are all good substitutes for Bramley apples.

Each of these types of apples has its own unique flavor and texture, so be sure to choose the one that best suits your needs.

Yield: 1 Serving

The 5 Best Substitutes for Bramley Apple

The 5 Best Substitutes for Bramley Apple
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • Granny Smith Apple
  • Honeycrisp Apple
  • Golden Delicious Apple
  • Rome Beauty Apple
  • Jonathan Apple

Instructions

  1. Pick your favorite substitute from the list above.
  2. Follow cooking directions for your selected substitute with the proper ratio of ingredients.

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