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The 5 Best Substitutes for Caster Sugar

Have you ever wondered what gives cookies and cakes their delicate crunch? Or how do meringues get their light, fluffy texture? The answer is often caster sugar.

Caster sugar, also known as superfine sugar, is a type of granulated sugar that has been ground down to form very fine crystals.

It dissolves more quickly than regular granulated sugar, making it ideal for preparing sweet sauces, glazes, and syrups.

It can also be used in baking to create a light and airy finish.

While it is available in most grocery stores, it can be difficult to find in some areas.

In this article, we will provide information on how to cook with caster sugar as well as the five best substitutes for caster sugar.

What is Caster Sugar?

what is caster sugar

Caster sugar, also known as superfine sugar, is a type of granulated sugar that has a very fine texture.

It is frequently used in baking and confectionery because it dissolves more quickly than other types of sugar.

When recipes call for “caster sugar,” they typically refer to this type of sugar.

Caster sugar is made by grinding granulated sugar into smaller particles.

The resulting product has a light, airy texture that makes it ideal for use in meringues and other delicate desserts.

Because it dissolves so readily, caster sugar is often used in syrups and other liquid sweeteners.

While it can be used interchangeably with other types of granulated sugar, caster sugar will produce slightly different results in some recipes.

As such, it is important to follow the recipe instructions carefully when using this type of sugar.

Compared to other granulated sugars, caster sugar has a relatively high price tag.

However, it is generally available in most supermarkets.

For those who do not have access to caster sugar, it can be made at home by grinding granulated sugar in a food processor or blender.

While caster sugar is often used in baking and confectionery, it can also be used for other purposes.

For example, it can be sprinkled on top of cereals or fruit as a sweetener.

It can also be used to make sugar scrubs and other beauty products.

The 5 Best Substitutes for Caster Sugar

If you’re out of caster sugar or don’t like the taste, there are plenty of substitutes that will work in their place.

Here are the five best substitutes for caster sugar.

1 – Granulated Sugar

granulated sugar

Granulated sugar, also known as table sugar, is a type of sugar that has a coarse texture and is typically used in baking.

While it can be used interchangeably with other types of sugar, such as caster sugar, it may not produce the same results.

Granulated sugar, on the other hand, may not dissolve as quickly and can add a bit of crunch to baked goods.

When substituting granulated sugar for caster sugar, you may want to consider whether or not the texture of your final product will be affected.

In some cases, such as when making meringues or macarons, using granulated sugar may be necessary to achieve the desired results.

However, in other cases, such as when making cakes or cookies, you may find that caster sugar produces a more desirable texture.

2 – Powdered Sugar

powdered sugar

If you’re looking for sugar that will dissolve quickly and create a smooth texture, then powdered sugar is the way to go.

Sometimes called confectioners’ sugar or icing sugar, this type of sugar is made by grinding down caster sugar to create a fine powder.

The small grains make it easy to work with, and it’s often used in icings, frostings, and other sweet toppings.

It’s also a good choice for baking, as it can help to create a light and fluffy texture.

If you’re considering substituting powdered sugar for caster sugar, keep in mind that you’ll need about twice as much to get the same sweetness.

In addition, powdered sugar tends to absorb moisture, so it’s not the best choice if you’re looking for a crisp finish.

However, it’s ideal for creating smooth, silky desserts.

3 – Brown Sugar

brown sugar

Brown sugar is a type of sugar that is typically produced by adding molasses to white sugar.

The resulting product has a characteristic brown color and a slightly sticky texture.

While brown sugar is not necessarily healthier than white sugar, it does have some unique properties that make it worth considering as a substitute for caster sugar.

For one thing, brown sugar is more hygroscopic, meaning that it absorbs moisture from the air more easily.

As a result, baked goods made with brown sugar are often moister and more flavorfully than those made with white sugar.

Additionally, the molasses in brown sugar add depth and complexity of flavor that can enhance recipes like cookies, cakes, and pies.

Even if you don’t typically bake with brown sugar, it’s worth keeping a bag on hand for when you want to add a little extra sweetness to your favorite dishes.

4 – Raw Sugar

raw sugar

And while there are many different types of sugar available, raw sugar is one of the most popular options.

Raw sugar is made from sugar cane that has been crushed and then evaporated.

As a result, it has a coarse, granulated texture that can add a touch of flavor and texture to baked goods.

While raw sugar can be used in any recipe that calls for sugar, it is particularly well-suited for recipes that call for caster sugar.

Caster sugar is finer than raw sugar, making it easier to dissolve.

However, the substitution of raw sugar for caster sugar can add a bit of extra flavor and texture to your baked goods.

So if you’re looking for a way to add a little something extra to your next batch of cookies, consider using raw sugar instead of caster sugar.

5 – Muscovado Sugar

muscovado sugar

Muscovado sugar is a type of unrefined sugar that has a dark brown color and a moist, soft texture.

It is made from sugar cane juice that has been crystallized and then dried.

Muscovado sugar contains more molasses than other types of sugar, giving it a deeper flavor.

It can be used as a substitute for caster sugar in baking recipes.

When substituting muscovado sugar for caster sugar, you may need to reduce the amount of liquid in the recipe because muscovado sugar is moister.

You may also want to bake your goods for a longer period of time because muscovado sugar will take longer to dissolve.

However, the end result will be a richer, more flavorful cake or cookie.

Conclusion

In conclusion, caster sugar has many uses and is a key ingredient in many recipes.

However, there are several substitutes that can be used if you are out of caster sugar or want to try something different.

Granulated sugar, powdered sugar, brown sugar, raw sugar, and muscovado sugar are all good substitutes for caster sugar.

Each of these substitutes will add its own unique flavor and texture to your baked goods.

So if you’re looking to change things up, don’t be afraid to experiment with different types of sugar.

Yield: 1 Serving

The 5 Best Substitutes for Caster Sugar

The 5 Best Substitutes for Caster Sugar
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • Granulated Sugar
  • Powdered Sugar
  • Brown Sugar
  • Raw Sugar
  • Muscovado Sugar

Instructions

  1. Pick your favorite substitute from the list above.
  2. Follow cooking directions for your selected substitute with the proper ratio of ingredients.
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