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The 5 Best Substitutes for Comet Hops

Do you like trying new things when it comes to brewing beer? If you answered yes, then you’ve got to check out Comet hops.

Comet hops are a great way to add a unique flavor to your beer.

But what exactly are they, and how do you use them? In this article, we’ll answer those questions and more.

We’ll also give you the lowdown on the five best substitutes for Comet hops.

So if you’re ready to experiment with your beer brewing, read on.

What are Comet Hops?

Comet hops are a variety of bittering hops that were first developed in the United States in the 1970s.

They’re named after the comets that were visible in the night sky during that time period.

Comet hops are known for their high alpha acid content, which makes them great for bittering beers.

They also have a unique flavor profile that includes notes of citrus, grapefruit, and pine.

Comet hops are typically used in American-style pale ales and IPAs.

If you’re looking to add a little something extra to your next batch of beer, give Comet hops a try.

Not sure how to use Comet hops? Don’t worry; we’ve got you covered.

When brewing with Comet hops, it’s important to remember that they have a high alpha acid content.

This means that they should be added early in the brewing process in order to achieve the desired bitterness levels.

Comet hops can also be used as a dry hop, which will impart even more of their unique flavor and aroma into your beer.

If you’re looking to experiment with your homebrew, we recommend giving Comet hops a try.

The 5 Best Substitutes for Comet Hops

Still not convinced that you should use Comet hops? No problem.

If you’re not into trying new things or if you can’t find Comet hops at your local homebrew store, don’t fret.

There are plenty of substitutes that will work just as well in your beer.

Here are 5 of the best substitutes for Comet hops:

1 – Galena

Galena is a type of hop that is known for its clean, crisp flavor.

It is often used in pale ales and other light-colored beers, as it does not add any color to the brew.

Galena is also a good hop for bittering, as it has a high alpha acid content.

However, it can be difficult to find in stores.

If you are looking for a substitute for Comet hops, then Galena is a good option.

It has a similar flavor profile and can be used in the same way.

Just remember that you may need to use a bit more Galena to get the same level of bitterness.

2 – Citra

Citra hops are a popular choice for brewers looking to add a burst of citrus flavor to their beer.

Originally developed in the United States, Citra hops are now grown all over the world.

Thanks to their intense aroma and flavor, Citra hops are often used as a late addition in brewing, providing a bright and juicy character that complements a wide range of beer styles.

When substituting Citra hops for other varieties, brewers should be aware that they will impart a significantly more intense flavor.

As a result, it is best to use them in recipes that call for large amounts of hops.

When substituting Citra hops for Comet hops, brewers can expect the finished beer to be slightly less bitter with a more pronounced citrus character.

3 – Centennial

Centennial hops are a variety of Cascade hops that were first developed in 1974.

They have a citrusy, floral aroma and a slightly bitter taste.

Centennial hops are often used in pale ales, IPAs, and other styles of beer.

If you’re looking for a hop to substitute for Comet hops, Centennial hops would be a good choice.

They have a similar citrusy aroma and can add a similar level of bitterness to your beer.

When substituting Centennial hops for Comet hops, keep in mind that they may impart a slightly different flavor to your beer.

However, overall, Centennial hops make a reliable substitute for Comet hops.

4 – Chinook

Chinook hops are a popular variety of hops used in brewing beer.

They were first cultivated in Washington state in the early 1900s, and they get their name from the Chinook tribe of Native Americans who live in the region.

Chinook hops are known for their high alpha acid content, which gives them a bitter taste that is often used to balance out the sweetness of malt in beer.

They also have a distinct floral aroma, making them a popular choice for IPA brewing.

If you want to substitute Chinook hops for Comet hops in your next batch of beer, keep in mind that Comet hops are less bitter, so you may need to use more of them to achieve the same flavor profile.

Chinook hops are also a good substitute for Cascade hops, which have a similar bittering power but a more citrusy flavor.

5 – Amarillo

Amarillo hops are a variety of bittering hops that originated in the United States.

They have a distinctive citrusy flavor and aroma, with notes of orange, tangerine, and grapefruit.

Amarillo hops are often used as a substitute for Comet hops, which can be difficult to find.

When substituting Amarillo hops for Comet hops, it is important to keep the following in mind: Amarillo hops are more potent than Comet hops, so you will need to use fewer Amarillo hops to achieve the same bitterness.

In addition, Amarillo hops will impart a different flavor to your beer, so be prepared for that when using this substitution.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the five best substitutes for Comet hops are Galena, Citra, Centennial, Chinook, and Amarillo.

Each of these hops has a similar flavor profile to Comet hops and can be used in the same way.

Just remember that you may need to use a bit more of the substitute hop to achieve the same level of bitterness.

Yield: 1 Serving

The 5 Best Substitutes for Comet Hops

The 5 Best Substitutes for Comet Hops
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • Galena
  • Citra
  • Centennial
  • Chinook
  • Amarillo

Instructions

  1. Pick your favorite substitute from the list above.
  2. Follow cooking directions for your selected substitute with the proper ratio of ingredients.

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