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Baking Simplified: 5 Best Substitutes for Cornmeal

Finding the perfect cornmeal substitute can feel like a kitchen puzzle.

We’ve been there – right in the middle of a recipe, only to realize the cornmeal is gone.

Not to stress! We’ve got secrets to share that’ll save your cornbread or coating for fried foods.

Ever thought about using crushed chips? Yeah, you heard that right. Our list includes the top five stand-ins for cornmeal.

Each one is a game-changer in its own way, making your dishes just as delicious.

You won’t miss a beat in your cooking rhythm. Curiosity piqued? Keep reading. You’ll thank us later.

The 5 Best Substitutes for Cornmeal

Cornmeal is a versatile ingredient commonly used in various culinary applications, including baking, breading, and making cornbread.

However, if you don’t have cornmeal on hand or prefer alternatives, there are several substitutes available.

In this guide, we will compare the top 5 substitutes for cornmeal, discussing their key characteristics and suggesting proper ratios to help you achieve similar results in your recipes.

SubstituteKey CharacteristicsProper Ratio
Almond MealGround almonds with a slightly sweet and nutty flavor; adds richness and moisture to dishesUse an equal amount of almond meal as a substitute for cornmeal
Chickpea FlourMade from ground chickpeas; has a nutty and slightly earthy flavor; gluten-free and high in proteinUse an equal amount of chickpea flour as a substitute for cornmeal
Wheat FlourA basic pantry staple; has a neutral flavor and provides structure and texture to baked goodsUse an equal amount of wheat flour as a substitute for cornmeal
Corn GritsCoarser version of cornmeal; offers a similar flavor and texture to cornmeal, with a slightly different textureUse an equal amount of corn grits as a substitute for cornmeal
Ground OatsOats ground into a fine powder; adds a slightly nutty flavor and can be used as a gluten-free alternativeUse an equal amount of ground oats as a substitute for cornmeal

Now let’s delve into each substitute in more detail:

1 – Almond Meal

almond meal

For individuals looking for a gluten-free option, almond meal is an ideal substitute.

It can either be store-bought or homemade.

If you choose to make it at home, you will need blanched almonds and a food processor.

When it comes to taste, and almond meal is nutty and has a slightly sweet flavor.

It also works well as a thickener for sauces.

This ingredient is popular in baking, and many people use it to replace flour.

Almond meal is a great way to add flavor and health benefits when making your almond milk.

It can be found at most stores or online, so you’ll never have any problem getting it.

To use up the leftovers from previous batches of this tasty treat, store them in an airtight container for two weeks before using them again on another day – make sure they are not too warm or will spoil.

  • Key Characteristics: Almond meal is made from ground almonds and has a slightly sweet and nutty flavor. It adds richness and moisture to dishes, making it a suitable substitute for cornmeal.
  • Proper Ratio: Use an equal amount of almond meal as a substitute for cornmeal. Adjust the recipe as needed to account for the moisture content and flavor.

2 – Chickpea Flour

chickpea flour

Chickpea flour is produced by grinding chickpeas into a fine powder.

It can be used as a direct replacement for cornmeal in most recipes.

Chickpea flour has a nutty flavor that some people describe as ‘earthy’ when it comes to taste.

Additionally, it’s high in protein and fiber.

This ingredient is popular in Indian cuisine and is often used to make flatbreads.

It can also be used as a thickener for soups and sauces.

You can buy chickpea flour at your local grocery store or natural foods market.

It’s great for making bread, pasta, and even pancake mix.

If you want to keep it stored in an airtight container, make sure not too much moisture gets in.

  • Key Characteristics: Chickpea flour, also known as garbanzo bean flour, is made from ground chickpeas. It has a nutty and slightly earthy flavor and is gluten-free. It is high in protein, making it a nutritious alternative to cornmeal.
  • Proper Ratio: Use an equal amount of chickpea flour as a substitute for cornmeal. Adjust the recipe to account for the different texture and flavor.

3 – Wheat Flour

wheat flour

Wheat is a simple and versatile grain that can be used in many different ways to make your favorite foods.

Some common uses for wheat include making bread, cookies, or breakfast cereal; using the flour on its own as an ingredient in recipes such as pancakes (both sweet versions with fruit filling), waffles/frozensettes; adding it during preparation time when baking cakes or as a thickener for sauces.

Wheat is a great option for those with diabetes or who want to avoid corn because it has fewer carbs.

You can substitute wheat flour cup-for-cup when a recipe calls for cornmeal.

You can buy wheat flour at most grocery stores, or you might be able to find it at a local mill.

If you have a wheat grinder at home, that’s great too.

Just make sure to store the flour in an airtight container to keep it fresh.

  • Key Characteristics: Wheat flour is a versatile pantry staple that has a neutral flavor. It provides structure and texture to baked goods and can be used as a substitute for cornmeal in certain recipes.
  • Proper Ratio: Use an equal amount of wheat flour as a substitute for cornmeal. Keep in mind that wheat flour may result in a slightly different texture and taste in the final dish.

4 – Corn Grits

corn grits

One of the most versatile products around, grits are a great addition to any meal.

They can be used instead of or in addition to rice and offer many health benefits.

Grits are made from dried corn that is ground into a coarse meal.

The texture of grits is similar to rice, but they have a nuttier flavor.

Grits are a good source of fiber and protein, and they’re also low in fat.

This makes them a great choice for people trying to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight.

You can find grits at most grocery stores, and they’re usually located in the same aisle as rice.

If you can’t find them, you can also order them online.

When cooking grits, be sure to follow the package directions carefully. Grits can be boiled, baked, or even fried.

  • Key Characteristics: Corn grits are a coarser version of cornmeal. They offer a similar flavor and texture to cornmeal but have a slightly different texture due to their larger particle size.
  • Proper Ratio: Use an equal amount of corn grits as a substitute for cornmeal. Adjust the cooking time and liquid ratios if necessary to achieve the desired consistency.

5 – Ground Oats

ground oats

For a gluten-free option, try using ground oats in place of cornmeal.

Oats are whole grain that is packed with nutrients like fiber and protein.

Oats have a mild flavor that will not compete with the other flavors in your dish.

They can be used as a breading for meats or vegetables or as an ingredient in pancakes or waffles.

You can find ground oats at most health food stores, or you can grind them yourself in a food processor.

Just be sure to store them in an airtight container, so they don’t go bad.

Oats are a healthy and versatile ingredient that can be used in many different ways.

The delicious and nutritious oatmeal is a great way to start your morning.

You can make it with or without milk, have it as dessert after dinner (or anytime), use them in place of flour on occasion – the list goes on.

I bet you didn’t know that there were so many possibilities for these little bits until now.

  • Key Characteristics: Ground oats, also known as oat flour, are oats that have been ground into a fine powder. They add a slightly nutty flavor and can be used as a gluten-free alternative to cornmeal.
  • Proper Ratio: Use an equal amount of ground oats as a substitute for cornmeal. Consider adjusting the recipe to account for the different texture and flavor.

The 5 Best Substitutes for Cornmeal

Searching for the ideal substitutes for cornmeal? Your quest ends here! We've compiled a list of the 5 best alternatives that will seamlessly replace cornmeal in your recipes.
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Course Substitutes
Servings 4 Servings

Ingredients
  

  • Almond Meal
  • Chickpea Flour
  • Wheat Flour
  • Corn Grits
  • Ground Oats

Instructions
 

  • Pick your favorite substitute from the list above.
  • Follow cooking directions for your selected substitute with the proper ratio of ingredients.
Keyword substitutes for cornmeal
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