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The 5 Best Substitutes for Taleggio Cheese

Cheese is a staple of European and American food, but people have eaten cheese since the domestication of cows.

We all enjoy a bit of cheese now and then, whether on its own or in a dish.

When it comes time to use cheese in cooking, the specific cheese used in the recipe may be out of stock.

The number of varieties available can be confusing for most of us, who are not experts.

The taste and texture of cheese can change a dish, so picking the right one is essential.

If you are looking for the best substitutes for Taleggio Cheese, you’ve come to the right place.

What is Taleggio Cheese?

what is taleggio cheese

Taleggio comes from the beautiful countryside of Italy, in the region of Lombardy.

Specifically, it originates from the valley that gave its name, Val Taleggio.

Milk is sourced from the local cows of the region and traditionally is matured in caves.

The maturing process takes six to ten weeks, during which the ripening cheeses are washed weekly with a saltwater sponge.

This process coaxes out the unique flavor of Taleggio, which is described as fruity and buttery.

This cheese has a semi-soft consistency with a mild taste and a unique tang.

Because of the washing process, the cheese’s rind is edible and has a coarse texture that contrasts its inside.

The 5 Best Substitutes for Taleggio Cheese

Taleggio has a unique taste, but other cheeses may still complement your dish the way you need.

Selecting a substitute means finding a cheese that will fill the same role in your dish.

1 – Brie Cheese

brie cheese

First, we have a French cheese similar to Taleggio in texture and taste.

Brie is a style of cheese that has developed from the original, named after the region in France it comes from.

It has a buttery taste that is milder than Taleggio and a distinct aroma.

The inside of Brie cheese is soft and easy to spread; you can use it on bread or other bases nicely.

It also melts well, like Taleggio, which makes it suitable to use as a substitute for recipes that are served hot.

Because of mass production, the most widely available Bries have a much milder flavor than Taleggio.

If you need a more robust taste, try to get a more authentic variety, like Brie de Melun.

2 – Fontina Cheese

fontina cheese

This is another Italian cheese that has a similar texture to Taleggio when young.

Fontina has a creamy, buttery texture, with small holes called eyes throughout the body.

Its nutty and savory taste makes it a popular choice for accompanying roast meats.

It melts even better than Taleggio, so it is also good for fondue and pasta.

Mature Fontina cheese develops a harder texture and a sharper taste.

Fontina shares the same aroma characteristics of Taleggio and is excellent for cheese boards and salads.

There are many commercial varieties of Fontina available, but they all have a milder taste and smell.

If you want a flavor closest to the authentic Taleggio, you need to get the original cheese made in Italy.

3 – Gruyere Cheese

gruyere cheese

Gruyere is a Swiss cheese made from cow’s milk that is matured for about 6 months.

It has a harder texture than Taleggio, making it great for serving in slices.

It is an incredibly popular cheese, one of the main cheeses used in the traditional fondue recipe.

This melting property is even better than Taleggio, so you will get perfectly melted cheese every time you use it.

If you are baking, you can’t go wrong with Gruyere.

Gruyere makes a great table cheese, meaning that it is excellent eaten raw.

If you are making a cheeseboard to go along with wine, this cheese will suit your need perfectly.

It has a fruity taste and has a consistency that is perfect for slicing.

4 – Bel Paese Cheese

bel paese cheese

Italians seem to love their cheese. When Egidio Galbani first made this cheese, he named it ‘Bel Paese’ or ‘beautiful country’ in Italian.

If you find a wheel of the original Bel Paese, you will know it is authentic by Italy’s map on the label.

Bel Paese is a semi-soft cheese from the same region as Taleggio.

It has a similar buttery taste as Mozzarella cheese and is a popular choice to serve with wine and fruits.

This cheese has the same melting properties we are searching for with Taleggio, making a good stand-in for the same recipes.

It is also perfect for pizzas, as the mild flavor will complement the toppings and melt very nicely on the crust.

5 – Havarti Cheese

havarti cheese

Last on our list is a semi-hard cheese originally made by the Danish.

Havarti has a springy, bouncy feel to it when you chew, which is why it is used as a table cheese.

The aroma of Havarti is sweet, unlike Taleggio which has a strong, slightly bitter smell.

Its taste is mild and sweet and has hints of nut to it.

This is perfect if you are preparing a dish for someone who doesn’t like strong cheese.

Havarti melts well, so you can use it for grilling or roasting, and it also is a good choice for pizzas and pasta.

Conclusion

We have been eating cheese for over 7,000 years, so there are many different kinds of cheese out there.

When you need one particular kind of cheese and can’t get it, it can be frustrating to select an alternative.

There are many passionate cheese lovers who can talk for ages about the subtle differences in cheeses.

Cooking with cheese should be fun, and hopefully, this article has helped you get the right cheese for your needs.

Yield: 4 Servings

The 5 Best Substitutes for Taleggio Cheese

The 5 Best Substitutes for Taleggio Cheese
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • Brie Cheese
  • Fontina Cheese
  • Gruyere Cheese
  • Bel Paese Cheese
  • Havarti Cheese

Instructions

  1. Pick your favorite substitute from the list above.
  2. Follow cooking directions for your selected substitute with the proper ratio of ingredients.
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